Ten Little Fingers and Ten Little Toes by Mem Fox and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury

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Apologies for the blurred image Boo was trying to run off with the book see her hand

Somehow this book passed me by the first time I became a parent. I truly don’t know how as it’s a beautiful book.

It was written in 2008 published by Walker Books Ltd the edition we have was published in 2011.

Rosie Rabbit getting ready for bedtime reading

Rosie Rabbit getting ready for bedtime reading

The text has a rhyming repetitive way of taking you through the story of explaining that although babies can be born in various places around the world and although they can each look slightly different they (on the most part) are all the same really as they have ten little fingers and ten little toes.

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Without a very young child knowing about differences around the world it’s a lovely way to introduce this subtly. The book however can grow with the child and could be used as a starting point of discussion suggesting where some of the babies may be from and showing them on a globe for example “there was one little baby born on the ice and another in a tent who was just as nice”.

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Each double spread page has illustrations of two different babies born in different cultures and then the rhyme continues over the page with illustrations of all the babies shown already up to that point with the repetitive rhyme “and both of these babies as everyone knows has ten little fingers and ten little toes”

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Boo who is 20 months loves this book she likes the illustrations of the babies and points to each one saying “baby”. It’s been a lovely way to reinforce where her fingers and toes are as I read it to her I get her to wiggle her fingers and show me her toes.The rhyme is not too energetic so it’s perfect for bedtime.

Our favourite part though which Boo gets excited about is the last few pages and where I do actually kiss her on the nose. The rhyme changes slightly in this part and it focuses on the narrator talking about their own baby;

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“But the next baby born was truly divine, a sweet little child who was mine, all mine. And this little baby as everyone knows, has ten little fingers, ten little toes and three little kisses on the tip of its nose.”

I often change the last bit instead of “tip of its nose” I change it for her I could change it for her name instead although this would change the rhyme perhaps too much.

As I noted earlier Boo likes this book, it has helped her remember which are her fingers and which are her toes and where her nose is and has started pointing them out on her doll too. She likes the illustrations and loves the anticipation of the end and receiving kisses on her nose! I think she would give this 10/10.

I wish I had found this book earlier not just for Boo but for Monkey who was born the year it was published. The book can be used for many starting points of discussion as children grow noticing the different cultures, different landscapes, discussing where in the world they could be from. Explaining all babies are the same no matter where they’re from. It’s a lovely book and would be perfect as a baby shower gift or a gift for a newborn I would therefore give this book 10/10.

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Angelina Ballerina by Katherine Holabird illustrated by Helen Craig

wp-1470895465538.jpgI hadn’t realised the story wasn’t written as recently as I thought having been written in 1983 to many a classic story however I don’t remember having this read to me as a child. The edition we have is a board book published in 2007 by Puffin Books.

The story is about a young mouse called Angelina who wants to be a ballerina however she hasn’t had lessons and she dances all the time when she’s meant to be doing other things such as tidying her room, getting ready for school even dancing around the school yard!

The story continues and I’m sure you can guess what happens, she has ballet lessons and as she has the lessons she doesn’t dance when she’s not meant to be much to the relief of her parents.

I bought this book for Boo for a couple of reasons, after quickly reading the book to myself in the bookshop (love I can do this with young children’s books as they’re not too long) and thought what a lovely story it was.  The illustrations are beautiful and are highly detailed. The cover caught my attention with the little silver hearts and the illustration of a mouse asleep in bed. But the main reason is Boo was given a music box as a present which has a pretty ballerina spinning round and round as the wind up classic music is played she loves it and has tried to copy going round and round many times so thought a book about a ballerina would appeal.

However it doesn’t seem to be the case….yet. I have read the story a few times now to Boo and she’s not very interested. At 20 months I think she’s a little too young for it at the moment as it has a lot of words unlike most of the other stories I’ve read to her recently. The last time I read it to her she got up from sitting on my knee and took the opportunity to play with a full size football of 7 year old Monkey’s while he was out!

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Boo does however like the illustrations which I thought she would as she loves the detailed illustrations in her two Beatrix Potter books.

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At the moment I think Boo would score this 5/10 as she likes the illustrations but the story hasn’t caught her attention yet. I think she will like it more when she’s 2+

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I on the other hand really enjoyed the story. I liked how the story starts with Angelina not having had ballet lessons still practices really hard and also how this can be related to all children who want to busy themselves doing something else instead of what they’re supposed to be doing like tidying their room. I find the illustrations are lovely I have always liked detailed illustrations in children’s books especially reading with an older child where you can ask them to look at the illustrations and point a particular item out. I know this book will grow with Boo and I think I will be asked to read it to her many times repeatedly in the coming years. I will score this 8/10.

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Tap The Magic Tree by Christie Matheson


wp-1470776046903.jpgHave you ever fell in love with a children’s book as an adult the quick way a young child does? Where you have to read the story no matter who is around or what is going on. This is what happened to me, we were in a small independent bookshop and there was only myself and Boo (and the man at the till not far away). I read it out loud, smiling and doing the actions the way I knew I would at home. Have you ever read a story and at the end know that even if it wasn’t going to be your child’s favourite book….yet it was now yours! This is truly what happened when I bought this book for Boo.

Tap The Magic Tree shows a tree going through the season’s showing a child how one bare tree at the start of the book can change, have leaves, blossom, the tree has fruit, the leaves change colour, the leaves fall off and then the magic starts again. This is all lovely and simple and has been shown in many books but its the words and the actions which go through the book that even a very young child can join in. A couple of examples are shown below;

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“Brush away the petals (swish!) and blow the tree a tiny kiss.”

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“Pat the leaves be gentle please.”

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“Aha! Now blow a whooshing breeze.”

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The illustrations are beautiful, they tell the story even without the words, step by step a child on their own could easily read and understand just by looking at the illustrations alone.

The story was written and illustrated by Christie Matherson, it was first published in 2013 but first published as a board book edition in 2016 (which is the edition we have). The information in the back of the book says collages were used to prepare the artwork.

Boo really loves this book which is fantastic as I previously said I fell instantly in love with it so I don’t mind reading it several times a day! Boo at only 20 months has already started doing many of the actions which shows she’s not only looking at the pictures she is now listening to the story which I find fascinating. She claps her hands, taps on the tree, wiggles her fingers and blows like the wind. This is set to be a favourite for quite a while as I can see it easily growing with her especially since there is a lovely blossom tree you can see from her bedroom window which looks similar to the tree in the book so when she’s older we can look at the book and decide which picture it looks like in the book. I think Boo would easily give this 10/10 it’s one of only a handful that she brings to me daily and has to have it read all the way through sometimes more than once or sometimes I read it to her and then she sits on my knee turning each page and pointing to the changing pictures.

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I give this book 10/10 as I’m sure you can gather by now I adore this book I don’t often use words like that to explain my love for a book but this really is a delight, it has reignited my love of good young children’s books and as Boo likes the actions so much I am now looking for other beautiful books with actions (any suggestions would be greatly welcomed), I am already hunting out another book by Christie Matherson called Touch the Brightest Star.

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Jemima Puddle Duck by Beatrix Potter

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Probably one of the best known stories written by Beatrix Potter about a duck called Jemima Puddle Duck who wants to find somewhere suitable to lay her eggs but Mr Tod a fox has other plans when supposedly helping her.

The edition we have is dated 2007 published by the Penguin Group. As with the Jeremy Fisher book this is a board book which is a lovely shape to hold.

The original story was first published by Fredrick Warne & Co in July 1908. She wrote the story on her farm which she bought in the Lake District. The characters are based on real people she knew at the farm.

The illustrations are the original Beatrix drew not the newer versions I have seen. I bought this at the same time as Mr Jeremy Fisher on a day trip to the Lake District with Boo when she was about 9 months old. I knew instantly shed like this book as she loves ducks. The illustrations have completely drawn her in and she loves this book more than perhaps some of her other books as she really takes the time to look at the illustrations in detail and has started pointing at Jemima when I ask her where the duck is.

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I would therefore suggest Boo would give this story 10/10 I too would give it the same 10/10 I remember my mam reading this to me one Christmas morning when I received it aged 5/6 I think it was one of the first of Beatrix Potter’s books read to me and I was hooked straight away and remain a fan even as an adult.

On a slightly different note today marks the 150th year since Beatrix Potter was born and strangely today of all days my son and I came across a hedgehog Mrs Tiggy-winkle in the middle of the road shuffling around, which thankfully a kind stranger rescued. If you follow my Instagram feed you may have seen the picture already if not you can find me @ccrainbowflowers

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Mr Jeremy Fisher by Beatrix Potter

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I think this may be one of a few Beatrix Potter stories which is less known.

The story is about Mr Jeremy Fisher who is a frog who wants to catch some minnows for supper as he’s having friends round. However instead of catching minnows he has a narrow escape from a trout!

The edition we have is dated 2007 published by the Penguin Group and is a board book which is a lovely shape easy for young children to hold and yet it still retains the original illustrations which Beatrix drew.

The original story was first published by Fredwick Warne & Co in July 1906. The origin of the story as with most of her stories was written in a letter she wrote to a child in 1893. She revised it in 1906, and moved its setting from the River Tay to the Lake District.

I bought this book in the Lake District on a day trip with Boo when she was about 9 months old. She’s loved the pictures since I bought it and will happily sit smiling turning the pages back and forth looking at the illustrations with their great detail. Boo now aged 19 months has started to listen to me as I read the story.

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Although she finds it fascinating looking at the illustrations she is more drawn to the Jemima Puddle Duck story which is in the same style of book. Therefore I would suggest she gives this book 9/10. I too would give this 9/10 it’s not my favourite story but I can’t help but love the illustrations.

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Fantastic Mr Fox by Roald Dahl illustrations by Quentin Blake

wp-1469372593956.jpgFollowing on from my last post about the summer reading challenge and the discovery that this year marks the 100th year since Roald Dahl was born I thought I’d review another of his great books Fantastic Mr Fox.

The edition of the book we have is dated 2016 and was published by Puffin Books however it was first published in 1970 by George Allen and Unwin.

The story is about a fox family and the head of the family is Mr Fox or as Mrs Fox calls him Fantastic Mr Fox. They live on a hill in the wood under a large tree. Below is the valley where 3 farmers live farmer Boggis kept chickens, farmer Bunce kept duck and geese and farmer Bean was a turkey and apple farmer. All 3 were mean and no one liked them.

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Mr Fox would go to each of these farms and have the best choice of food from each. However one night the farmers have had enough and wait for Mr Fox to try and shoot him dead. Here begins the story of how crafty Mr Fox and the other animals living in the wood find a way to outsmart the farmers and live in harmony together.

For the older reader the story could be used to examine how foxes are classed as pests for farmers stealing and killing their animals. It could also be used to talk about hunting and there is a great number of descriptive language used which could be useful for students studying this topic.

For the younger child such as 7 year old Monkey it was a great adventure to read what the farmers would try next and to see how Mr Fox would escape.

Monkey enjoyed this story and thought the farmers were “silly”. He rated the book as 7/10 as it wasn’t as funny as other Roald Dahl books.

I remember reading this when I was a child however I was older than Monkey and read it one wet Easter when I was about 9 or 10 therefore at that age I could understand the darker side of the Fox family being hunted and knew that Mr Dahl would have ensured this fox family would come to no harm unlike other foxes. As an adult reading this to Monkey I enjoyed it possibly more than I did as a child and as it had been a while since I had read it I couldn’t remember all of the story. The parts of the story about the farmers trying to plot to kill the family and in particular Mr Fox and the worried fox children in the below page “how will they kill us mummy” I didn’t enjoy but this was only because I know how sensitive Monkey can be thankfully he was enjoying the adventure and the sad parts like this are well balanced with the calmness of Mr Fox and the outlandish ideas the farmers have to capture him. I give this story 8/10.

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Summer Reading Challenge 2016

A selection of books you might find in your library

A selection of books you might find in your library for your own Summer Reading Challenge

It’s that time again with school summer term coming to a close and then a long hot (well we live in hope in the UK) summer. It’s a time where as a child I rarely went home only going home when playing outside with friends to either get something to eat or drink.

As summer goes on and friends leave for their holidays or you just want some quiet time, reading a book or several during the summer is perfect especially sitting out in the garden in the shade or in the sun.

Have you heard of The Summer Reading Challenge for children? This is the UK’s biggest reading promotion for children run by The Reading Agency and in library’s.

The challenge is for children to read 6 books throughout the summer holidays, the books don’t need to be specific titles they can be non fiction, fiction, joke books, comics, picture books, audio books basically anything your child enjoys reading counts towards the challenge but they must be borrowed from the library. The children need to be aged 4-11 years old. The Challenge started in Scotland on Saturday 25th June and in England and Wales it started on Saturday 16th July.

The Reading Agency states children’s reading practice can dip in the summer holidays, I know from experience my son last year lost interest as soon as school finished (he was only 6 at the time) and this year before he heads off to the junior school in September I want to ensure he reads during the holidays.

The website continues to say “The Summer Reading Challenge has helped get three quarters of a million children into libraries each year to keep up their reading skills and confidence. Because everything changes when we read”.

The Reading Agency have released a book collection list of 72 suggested books to read the list is divided into two – one for younger children and one for older children. A lot of these are new reads which will be published this summer, and many will be displayed in libraries. You can find the list here

There is a different theme each year. The theme for the 2016 Summer Reading Challenge is The Big Friendly Read as it’s the 100th year since Roald Dahl was born.

The Big Friendly Read, features some of Roald Dahl’s best loved characters and the amazing artwork of illustrator, Sir Quentin Blake. It highlights themes such as invention, mischief and friendship all of which appear in Roald Dahl’s most famous books.

Everyone who joins The Big Friendly Read will receive a fold up card wallet, which includes a range of fun activities and space for children to keep track of their progress and rate the books they have read. There are six limited edition Quentin Blake collector cards to collect; some are scratch and sniff!  These slot into the collector folder. Each card celebrates a popular Roald Dahl theme: mischief, invention, adventure, wordplay, child champions, and friendship.  Children will receive one card for every book they read and those who complete the challenge will receive a certificate.

For adults and carers there’s a Facebook page which you can find here

Another great website supporting this is the Summer Reading Challenge it tracks children’s reading all year round, children can enter competitions, has links to YouTube videos about the challenge and author reviews, children can review books, leave messages, it gives book suggestions children have recommended and can be searched by age/gender there are also recommendations from celebrities. The website also has book related games for children to play they include previous games from other summer reading challenges;

  • “Race against the clock to fill in the book title blanks with Title Dash game”
  • “Find unicorn friends as you race around Mythical Maze game”
  • “Chase bats and escape from ghouls in Creepy House”
  • “Help Jeremy save his books from Aesop in Story Lab game”

Visit your local library and join up to the challenge and get involved in the fun activities many libraries offer – there’s a chocolate challenge at our local library next week to celebrate Charlie and the Chocolate Factory you never know what you’ll find at your own library so go and investigate!

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The Jolly Rogers and the Monster’s Gold by Jonny Duddle

wp-1468389427861.jpgThis is a story about Matilda who has a pirate family for friends. To the pirates she is a ‘landlubber’ someone who stays on dry land but she is best friends with one of the pirates Jim Lad who often sends her notes in bottles whilst he’s out to sea.

One day she finds a treasure map in a bottle she has fished out of the sea but it’s not from her best friend. Matilda does know though that Jim Lad’s family would like to see the map. The pirate family consists of Jim Lad’s mum, dad, Nugget his sister his Grandpa, Bones the dog and Squawk the macaw.

On the treasure map there’s a message “Dear fellow private….Do ye want to be rich?” And so the adventure begins.

I bought this book for Monkey as a little Christmas present, I just seen it one day in a supermarket and as it was about pirates I picked it up to have a look.

I have to admit I stood in the supermarket aisle having a little read of it and was completely drawn into the story straight away. Not only did I find the way it was written intriguing as a lot of it is written the way a pirate may speak but it also has fantastic illustrations all in black and white but they are drawn so brilliantly and have a lot of detail.

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We’d reached a point with me reading a bedtime story to Monkey where he still wanted me to read to him which I am more than happy to do but the picture books were too young for him but most books with chapters were too long or didn’t have many engaging pictures, so when I found this book I knew it would be a good starting point to move onto chapter books as although it’s in chapters they’re not too long for a child to become too bored or the reader to spend all night reading. The text is very clear, the size of the book is perfect and although being 159 pages long it doesn’t feel overwhelming.

The story is by Jonny Duddle who has written a couple more books in this series The Jolly Rogers and the Ghostly Galleon and The Jolly Rogers and the Cave of Doom. This story was first published in 2015 by Templar publishing illustrations by Jonny Duddle.

Well Monkey thoroughly enjoyed this book and was more than happy to go to bed just to have another chapter read to him and I too even got excited about reading to him again and reading a longer story meant I could enjoy the story too and feel like I wasn’t just reading to him for the sake of it.

Monkey without too much hesitation gives this book 10/10 as it’s about pirates, the story is exciting but not scary and the pictures are “really cool”.

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I really enjoyed this book too. It has a believable story, the illustrations are fantastic and it got me enjoying reading again to Monkey. We were both in fact sad when it finished so we went and bought another of Jonny Duddle’s books the next day which I will review in another post. In the meantime I give this book 10/10.

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My First Words Let’s Get Talking! By Dawn Surety

wp-1467265397643.jpgAs you can probably see from my recent posts Boo is on a huge learning mission and she loves books with photographs in best which she can point to and ask “what’s that” age 19 months she is enquiring daily what everything is which I love and therefore we have a lot of these photograph books.

This book is published by Dorling Kindersley (DK) in 2008 and features an incredible number of photos each one categorised into the following areas;

wp-1467265464905.jpgAll about me – pictures of babies showing various actions, different faces, words with lines pointing out different parts of the body such as hand, nose etc

wp-1467265511721.jpgClothes and shoes – photos of various clothes for boys and girls it doesn’t distinguish whether certain clothes are only for boys/girls unlike a lot of similar books.

wp-1467265548688.jpgAround the house – this category has photos of things found in all houses such as kettle, sofa, table etc

wp-1467265592922.jpgFood and drink – this shows a variety of food not just fruit and vegetables it also shows fairy cakes.

wp-1467265616176.jpgPets – I like how this section shows puppies as well as dog and same with kittens and cat so this can start discussions of who the baby adult animal belongs to. It also includes other animals which are often pets like rabbits and goldfish it even includes pony!

wp-1467265636674.jpgPlaytime – this is Boo’s favourite at the moment it shows various toys, she keeps pointing to the ring tower which I’m currently trying to find something similar and she likes the picture of the teddy bear she points at this and correctly says teddy, aww.

wp-1467265653180.jpgThings that go – this section has many pictures of vehicles if my son had this book at her age this would certainly have been his favourite. It features a picture of a digger, fire engine and train. My only problem with this page is that the lorry is labelled as truck.

wp-1467265667210.jpgAt the park – this features items found in most parks such as bench, tree and even has a photo of a sparrow!

wp-1467265681858.jpgAt the seaside – photos included are deck chair,  seashells and crab.

wp-1467265692860.jpgOn the farm – as you would expect it has the usual animals horse, donkey but again includes photos of adult animals along with their young such as sheep and lamb, goat and kid. It also has photos of non animals such as tractor, wheat and scarecrow.

wp-1467265703562.jpgIn the wild – this section covers animals that most children will only ever see at the zoo such as penguin, lion and giraffe.

wp-1467265718797.jpgColours and shapes – this is a lovely little section to include it shows various colours but not as usual paint swatch type pictures but shows photos of items of a particular colour grouped together such as green is shown as leaves and a green apple. White is a group of white rabbits. Along the bottom of the page there’s shapes in various colours so for an older child you could ask them to match up the pink heart to the pink flowers for instance.

wp-1467265730580.jpgNumbers – this shows numbers 0- 10 with the correct amount of the same pictures with the number such as 7 fish with the number 7 and 9 bananas with the number 9. It also has a photo of 2 child hands so for older children this could be used as a first look at numbers and counting.

Each section is easily found as each section has a tab with a photo which is perfect for young children.

Boo really enjoys this book and I can see how much this will grow with her as her curiosity grows about things in the world. The book could be used to find same/similar objects around the child’s own house for instance as not everyone’s sofa will look like the one in the book as an example.

Given she’s too young to really give a proper rating I have to look how she reacts to similar books, in this case she does enjoy it however she appears to prefer another set of DK books which I’ll write about. I think this book although fantastic value for money and consists of many pictures is perhaps a little too big, heavy and even overwhelming at the moment which is why she seems to prefer the smaller books of a similar nature. On her behalf the rating would be 7/10 however in time I am sure this will change.

As I have mentioned before it really does have a fantastic number of photos, showing various objects/animals/babies displayed in an easy to understand format with lovely clear photos. It is a book which I can see grow with her and provide many future starting points of conversion and therefore I give this book 10/10.

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar’s abc by Eric Carle

An abc book which adults will enjoy to look at too

An abc book which adults will enjoy to look at too

Very few people will not know who the character of Eric Carle’s famous book The Very Hungry Caterpillar is which is a childhood favourite of mine. This book explores the abc with help of the hungry caterpillar and lots of animal friends who I believe can be found in several other Eric Carle books.

The book was first published in 2015 by Puffin Books.

The very first page and last page has the letters of the alphabet set out in the same colours and style as you find throughout the book i.e. the letter ‘a’ is red with what looks like finger painted dots.

Each letter of the alphabet has a separate page on white background making a very good visual impact to all who read the book. Under each letter which are all lowercase letters there is a picture of an animal which starts with that particular letter which is then followed by the word of what the picture is, the first letter written the same colourful way as what the letter is first depicted as.

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The alphabet doesn’t just concentrate on the animals most alphabet books have which as an adult certainly makes it more interesting. Below is the list of animals alphabetically used.

Ants

Bird

Caterpillar

Dog

Eagle

Frog

Gull

Horse

Iguana

Lizard

Mouse

Narwhal

Owl

Penguin

Quetzal

Rhino

Snail

Tiger

Unicom

Vulture

Walrus

Xolo

Yak

Zebra

There are a few in the list I’ve not heard of before which makes it interesting to both the adult reader but also perhaps to an older sibling reading the book to their younger brother/sister.

I've never heard of a narwhal have you?

I’ve never heard of a narwhal have you?

Boo is too young to fully appreciate this book yet and yet she recognises the picture of the Dog and bird the rest of the time she points at pages randomly and I tell her the letter, point to the picture and tell her what he picture is of which she enjoys doing a lot at the moment.

Since Boo is too young to review the book properly I have to go on what she thinks of this book compared to others and I have to say this is slowly becoming a favourite of hers, in fact at the weekend I put it in our bag to take out for the day and she happily looked through this book while I read my son’s comic to him. To make it even better my son when he became bored of the comic looked through this book with Boo it was such a lovely sight to see Monkey age 7 explaining to his baby sister Boo age 19 months what all the letters were and pointing out all the beautiful bright colours, I’m sure sure this will only get better as Boo grows so I think she would give this 9/10 at the moment.

I love this book, so many abc books concentrate on the boring and same suggestions such as b for butterfly and s for snake with usually boring illustrations but each illustration is a true piece of art which I would happily display and not necessarily only in a children’s playroom. On the back of the book there’s a website address for information on Eric Carle’s books, information about him, resources, ideas, lots of interesting information on how the illustrations are made – it’s certainly worth a look I was impressed with the amount of information available there. There is also a link to the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art which I would love to visit one day. The website is:
eric-carle.com

I will give this book 10/10 as it will certainly grow with children and can be used for lots of things not just simply learning letters. It could be used to start a conversation, research on the various animals depicted especially the lesser known. The colours of the illustrations can be used for colour recognition. Some children might want to make a story up about the animals to help remember the alphabet. It can also be used as a way to learn how to do collages which is how Eric Carle creates these illustrations. This is just a few ideas I’m sure there are many more, have fun read learn and create.

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